Tag Archives: London Horror Society

TV HORROR SHOWDOWN: AHS V BATES MOTEL

As I touched upon in my recent review of The Exorcist TV programme, we horror fans are seemingly spoilt for choice when it comes to terrifyingly good TV horror.  So much choice in fact that there are many shows that I am yet to watch a single episode of, including Penny Dreadful, Fear the Walking Dead, The Strain and so on…

TV Horror - AHS

Two series I have managed to invest a lot of time in recently are American Horror Story and Bates Motel, for very different reasons.

AHS was a brand spanking new inject into horror TV, brought to us by the very capable Ryan Murphy (although I have never/will never watch Glee – shudder) with a great cast and great prospects.  BM promised an unflinching coming of age story of a true psycho with a wonderful cast of promising young talent and seasoned veterans.

I’ve decided to pit the two against each other in a series of categories to determine once and for all which TV horror series is better: American Horror Story or Bates Motel.

Written for the London Horror Society, read the full post at http://londonhorrorsociety.co.uk/tv-horror-showdown-ahs-v-bates-motel/.

First Look: The Exorcist TV Series – Chapter 1

TV is the new film. The birth of online channels such as Netflix and Amazon Prime have opened up new avenues for TV programmes, creating bigger, better shows and grabbing larger and more diverse audiences. This has been great news for horror fans as not only do we get brand-spanking new awesome shows such as Stranger Things, American Horror Story and the eagerly anticipated Lucifer, but there has also been a massive rise in horror films being adapted into TV shows, such as Sleepy Hollow, Hannibal and the brilliant Bates Motel. Now we are getting the ultimate, the daddy of all horror… The Exorcist TV Show.

The Exorcist TV Show

I watched The Exorcist film as a young girl with my parents and a friend. We giggled at the sexual references, fidgeted through the “boring talking bits” but were ultimately silenced by Regan’s transformation from young girl to demon. I couldn’t sleep that night. The film crept into my very soul and chilled me to the bone.

As a grown up I can now watch it alone and sleep like a baby but it hasn’t lost any of its power. It is terrifying, there has never been an equal and it is adamantly my dad’s all time favourite film (good taste runs in the family).

So I was luckily enough to get a sneak preview of The Exorcist TV show, Chapter 1 and let my cry come unto thee. I grabbed my boyfriend, turned off the lights and huddled down, waiting… and I was not disappointed.

Written for the London Horror Society, read the full post at http://londonhorrorsociety.co.uk/first-look-exorcist-tv/.

Film Review: Blair Witch

I was 14 when the buzz around a film called The Blair Witch Project began. My mate and I quickly became obsessed, reading everything we could find online, buying the film poster and scribbling odes to the “witch” in geography class – we were convinced it was real.

Incredibly I didn’t actually get to see it for over a year, until my best mate stole it from her sister and brought it to a sleepover. And I loved it. Yeah, it’s slow going, not a lot happens and there is a lot of snot, but that final scene… I tell you, it’s stayed with me…

A large part of the success of the film was down to its phenomenal marketing. So many of us thought it was a real witch and a real story (maybe it is?). It also cost less than £1M to make and grossed over £248M – utterly incredible! Now, director Adam Wingard has also pulled off an impressive publicity stunt with Blair Witch by masquerading it as The Woods before the big announcement at Comic Con. I was gobsmacked – what a brilliant surprise.

Written for the London Horror Society, read the full post at http://londonhorrorsociety.co.uk/film-review-blair-witch/.

Film Review: Video Killer

Video Killer is a 74 minute film, written and directed by Richard Mansfield.  It tells the story of Amy, who receives a VHS tape and soon after realises that she is being stalked by a masked figure.  We go on to learn that she must track down other victims in order to try and work out who is trying to kill them, and her.

The film itself follows the journey of five different characters who are only connected by the situation they find themselves in.  When they are filming themselves, trying to find “it”, you find yourself searching every inch of the frame for a glimpse of the masked figure.  Some of the characters’ journeys end quite unexpectedly and you soon realise that it is mainly Amy’s story that’s the focus.

Written for the London Horror Society, read the full post at http://londonhorrorsociety.co.uk/film-review-video-killer/.

Film Review: Lights Out

After seeing the awesome trailer for Lights Out, I was very excited.  Hearing that James Wan is connected to the project made me want to see it even more.  So upon its release I headed to the cinema, sat in the dark and waited to jump out of my seat. Unfortunately, I’m still waiting.

Lights Out is about a supernatural being who lurks in the shadows and preys upon a family, forcing the estranged daughter to uncover their terrifying past.

Written for the London Horror Society, read the full post at http://londonhorrorsociety.co.uk/film-review-lights-out/.

5 Horror Clichés I Hate!

Firstly, I think it’s safe to say that we’re all horror fans. Otherwise, why would you be reading this post on a horror website? And more to the point, why would I have written it? That said, I’m also pretty positive that we all love horror for different reasons.  I grew up with horror; it is part of who I am and I will never leave it for another mistress.  However, like many film genres, horror can make be pretty lazy…  particularly when it comes to clichés.  You’ll definitely have your own, and I’m sure you’ll find some more forgivable (maybe even lovable?) than the others.  Here are the five horror clichés that I hate the most:

Written for the London Horror Society, read the full post at http://londonhorrorsociety.co.uk/5-horror-cliches-hate/.

Film Review: Avant-Macabre

Avant-Macabre is a 6-minute black and white, silent(ish) horror film by John H Shelton. It features only a few characters, and its main content is voice-overs reading original poems. I have not watched many short horror films in my life (other than bingeing on BBC3’s The Fear), so did not know what to expect when asked to write a review for this film.  Thankfully, I was pleasantly surprised.

Written for the London Horror Society, read the full post at http://londonhorrorsociety.co.uk/film-review-avant-macabre/.